Friday

How to Teach Time Management to Your Kids



Achieving balance in your life seems like it takes a lifetime to learn. We try and try to find time to work, play, give back to others, and still find time to pursue our own passions. That me-time stuff is really hard to come by as a mother.

My oldest son Quinn seems to already have it figured out, though. Either he gets more hours in the day, or he's just really good (or really motivated) at finding this balance. Kid's got straight A's, aced both college entrance exams, sets up his own college visits, babysits his little brother AND other kids in the neighborhood, holds a leadership position on two volunteer Junior Boards, competes in math tournaments for his high school, and takes art classes.

He's got time management licked.



In my house, lists are essential. And always break tasks down into little pieces that you can do easily – then you never get overwhelmed. Homework is the first thing you do when you walk in the door, and if there's work to be done we work first and play second. Figuring out your priorities helps you decide what to do first.

As Luka gets older, I hope he follows in Quinn's footsteps!

This week I asked my readers on the Mommy's Wish List Facebook page for some of their ideas regarding teaching time management to their kids.

Time Management Ideas from my Readers:
1. The only thing that has helped mine complete major assignments prior to deadline is by the threat of taking all electronic devices if they don't! – Jerri

2. We use a lot of lists and charts. – Keri

3. [I teach them] the importance of appreciating one's belongings and home. Keeping the house clean, toys picked up means that we can spend more time on homework, fun activities. – Heather

4. Be organized as a parent. Your kids want to be like you, if you are disorganized they will be also. Lead by example. – Shane


Balance is the key to a successful, fulfilling day.
Two weeks ago, we started our Tips for a Great Start from Team Kellogg's month with this free puzzle printable to get your kid's mind going first thing in the morning. Then, last week, I shared a few kid's lunchbox ideas that were out of the box. And this week, you could download the origami fortune teller, fold it, and have it choose a few morning calisthenics for your young'uns.

Today, let's all take a a look at how we help our kids divide their time, so that they can have not only a great start every day, but a great day all day long.



How my son manages to get straight A's, be on two volunteer junior boards, babysit, plan for college, and take art classes on the side.
Honestly, I'm not exactly sure how he does all that. I started teaching him time management skills in first grade, thinking that was probably more important than times tables and expository writing. I think it paid off. Quinn uses time management to fit it all in and have a balanced life. He says he wouldn't want to just do one thing all the time.
1. Use a Dry Erase White Board on your wall in your room to see all your work for the week at once.
2. Reading a big book for school? Do it mathematically! Divide how many pages in the entire book by the number of days until you need to have it done. Read that number of pages every day.
3. Need 100 references on notecards for your term paper? Do 10 a day for 10 days on the very first day the paper is assigned. Then you'll have all your resources ready to write your rough draft way ahead of time.
4. Start your assignments the day the are assigned, don't wait until the night before they're due. Do them a little at a time each day until they're due and you won't get overwhelmed.
5. Knock out all the little tasks first. Then tackle the bigger ones one at a time.
We also use an electronic calendar on both his and my computer, color coded so that all of his activities are all one color. They are synced in the cloud so that we can both see them on our calendars. This helps us keep straight when his board meetings are, when the math tournaments are, and when he has art class.



I've got two more creative parenting tips like this coming up this month, courtesy of Team Kellogg's, who is graciously sponsoring my blog for the month of January to help get my family and yours off to a great start in the new year. I'm so excited to be a part of the team and try to make a difference in the morning – and all day long! You can find more Great Starts tips on Tend.com.

About Kellogg's Cereals
From family favorites like Rice Crispies and Corn Pops, to classics like Raisin Bran and Frosted Flakes, you can usually make a difference in your grocery budget and save money on your favorite Kellogg's cereals with a printable coupon – which you can find on my printable coupon resource page.

About Team Kellogg's™
Kellogg’s® believes that From Great Starts Come Great Things®. So we’re helping Moms start every day with a tip from the top athletes of Team Kellogg’s™ and Team USA dietitians. The thirty days leading up to the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games will each feature fun pieces of advice to help families fuel just like the athletes of Team Kellogg’s. To see all 30 tips, visit Kelloggs.com/GreatStartsTips.

Do you have some great time management ideas that you've taught your kids?

Subscribe to Mommy's Wish List by email for tips on strategic shopping, creative parenting, being artsy, and other important things like making dinner when you hate cooking.

Mommy's Wish List Disclosure: Compensation was provided by Kellogg’s via Glam Media. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and are not indicative of the opinions or positions of Kellogg’s.
Enhanced by Zemanta
How to Teach Time Management to Your KidsSocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

No comments:

® Mommy's Wish List, Dine on a Dime, Circular Surfer, Christmas Intelligence, Stalk Market, Shopping Intelligence, Coupon Whereabouts, are trademarks of Wish List Creative 2005 - 2016.
 

Newspaper subscription Google+